Bocci 28.280 light installation at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013 | urdesign magazine

Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013

Category: Design Published on 16 Sep, 2013 Tags: , , , ,
Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013

During this year’s London Design Festival eleventh edition, the Canadian design brand Bocci is presenting a lighting installation at the festival’s hub venue, the Victoria & Albert Museum. Entitled 28.280 and designed by Omer Arbel, the installation is a massive vertically punctuated light sculpture located in the main atrium of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

2 bocci 28 280 light installation at the victoria albert museum for the london design festival 2013 Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013

The installation, featuring Bocci’s celebrated 28, descends through the large existing void cutting through the entire length of the V&A building, with an astonishing height of more than 30 meters. The intent of the installation is twofold; On the one hand, it is a pure celebration of the monumental open height of the building, which uses light to crystallize a powerful phenomenological experience for the viewer. On the other hand, it is the most ambitious exploration to date of a novel glass blowing technique.

3 bocci 28 280 light installation at the victoria albert museum for the london design festival 2013 Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013 4 bocci 28 280 light installation at the victoria albert museum for the london design festival 2013 Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013 5 bocci 28 280 light installation at the victoria albert museum for the london design festival 2013 Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013 6 bocci 28 280 light installation at the victoria albert museum for the london design festival 2013 Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013 7 bocci 28 280 light installation at the victoria albert museum for the london design festival 2013 Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013 8 bocci 28 280 light installation at the victoria albert museum for the london design festival 2013 Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013 9 bocci 28 280 light installation at the victoria albert museum for the london design festival 2013 Bocci 28.280 at the Victoria & Albert Museum for the London Design Festival 2013

Bocci at the Victoria and Albert Museum, for the London Design Festival 2013 | All images © NICK BARR

Recommended:

Lotus Dome by Daan Roosegaarde
Pocket Chair by DING3000 for Discipline
Trame table lamp by Sébastien Cordoleani
Marc Jacobs to Celebrate 'Sparkling Together for 30 Years' of Diet Coke
Aria and Avia lamp by Zaha Hadid for Slamp
SmokeStack outdoor heater by Frederik Roijé
Wireflow, immaterial sculptural lights by Arik Levy for VIBIA
Alix Sofa By Tilt for Amaze
Chantilly Lamps by Constance Guisset for Moustache
Wine Chillers by Joe Doucet with Neal Feay Studio
Feestaardvarken: Giant Party Aardvark by Florentijn Hofman
The Conductor: interactive installation by Faye Toogood for Established & Sons
Fishpond City by Lu Yang, Christian Lindle and Raoul Bukor
Reversed Volumes by mischer‘traxler studio
Material Container Stools by Jeonghwa Seo
Creation Cinema kinetic sculpture by ENESS at Melbourne Museum
Studio Family reimagines the Holy Bible with an intuitive iPhone app
Colony armchair by Skrivo for Miniforms
Nike 2014 #BETRUE Collection
University of Stuttgart realized a carbon-fibre pavilion based on beetle shells

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

 

Submit Your Work